Contents & Samples

Web Page 5 - Featured Image

 SAMPLE CHAPTER:

Chapter 1: Methods & Challenges in Visual Interpretation

 

… This book is a new kind of storytelling, as the great Zeno states. Its style is a mix of Greek, Latin, Lombard, mixed with terms in Hebrew, Arabic, and Caldean…that which contains all human Knowledge recognised by many a sage whom I have met personally. Architects, Mathematicians, Philosophers, Antiquarians, and even Alchemists, have perspired at great lengths to understand this text with much patience and fatigue. Even I myself fatigued patiently with this erudite book; as a result, I affirm that Architects, Mathematicians, Philosophers, and Antiquarians, can read this tome with pleasure, and with an occasional belch…”

– Tommaso Temanza, Venetian architect, 18th century.

This book is an attempt to illustrate what was before almost impossible to see without surviving the Hypnerotomachia’s exhaustive language. My aim is to bring the text alive with artist reconstructions, to show what Poliphilus describes in his dream account, where descriptions of architecture are often lost on the readers of the almost incomprehensible passages. Much of the value of the Hypnerotomachia (and certainly much of its beauty) is diminished by the author’s labyrinthine and encyclopaedic way of using language. My goal is to increase the significance of the work through an artistic rather than textual interpretation. With a few exceptions, nothing like this has ever been accomplished at a large scale (that is, toward reconstructing a complete set of monuments described by Poliphilus). Historically, only one artist had attempted even a limited reconstruction. The works of Eustache Le Sueur, (1617-1655) include a few paintings depicting Poliphilus’ visions and experiences. And only recently has a colleague of mine, Silvia Fogliati, been able to attempt a virtual reconstruction of the Island of Citera according to Poliphilus (published by Franco Maria Ricci).
This work is not an attempt to find the “truth” behind this renaissance text, nor is it a disrespectful imposition on literary traditions associated with this scholarly work. I invite readers to make their own such judgments. Instead, these reconstructions were a result of trying to understand the Hypnerotomachia along with its difficult language.

 

Methodology – A Brief Description of Methods Utilized in Developing Artist, Virtual Reconstructions:

The work began with a rigorous and critical reading of the original Aldine text. I took note of every detail describing ornament, architecture, measurement, and construction. At first I made sketches directly onto the pages of the contemporary Italian translations as a way of understanding Poliphilus’ descriptions. Naturally, the page margins did not provide enough space for this practice, so I moved to a sketch book, where I attempted to piece together the architectural clues left behind by this 500-year-old narrator, to at least “picture” what he was describing. The way the text originally presented itself, even after its modern translation, made it almost impossible for me to envision his dream with clarity. Both the language and the encyclopaedic presentation used by the author made my goal difficult.

 

Web Page 5 - Image 2Still, sketching was a necessary step to get something out of what the author had encrypted in his pseudo-invented language. (The text is written mostly in Italian, but is full of words coined from Latin and Greek roots, as well as words from Arabic, Greek, Hebrew and hieroglyphic languages. And when these languages didn’t suffice, the author invented his own.) After a few conclusions on drawing form, literary research was necessary in order to understand significance of the classical samples that were introduced by the author. Almost for each monument, I had to create a “database” of information in order to keep up with Poliphilus while describing materials of construction, ornamentation, archetypes, et cetera. I constantly updated my sketches.
Simultaneously, I examined contemporary works by important scholars in the field of the Hypnerotomachia and early Renaissance Humanism in order to understand the significance and context of what I was producing in my sketchbooks: the works of Professor Maurizio Calvesi, Emanuela Kretzulesco-Quaranta, Liane Lefaivre, Stefano Borsi, translations and comments by G. Pozzi, L.A. Ciapponi, Marco Ariani, Mino Gabriele, and Pilar Pedraza. The classics where also very helpful: Leon Battista Alberti and Vitruvius. The best resource was the original Hypnerotomachia Poliphili itself. I also studied the 1546 French edition translated by Jean Martin, as well as the first, partial English translation by Robert Dallington in 1592. Although my research and graphic work started many years before its publication, the first, complete English translation by Joscelyn Godwin in 1999 was a pleasant help to the linguistic challenges I had to face.

 

Web Page 5 - Image 5Through the years while on study and practice assignments, traveling through the Veneto and the Lazio regions of Italy helped me in my research. I had begun collecting images and composing drawings of architectural works and techniques that seemed related to what I was finally “releasing” from the Hypnerotomachia with my sketches. In the end, while sorting all the evidence both from the text and from what I was collecting from my travels, I allowed computer graphics to assist me in doing the rest.

 

Web Page 5 - Image 7The resulting virtual reconstructions are not by all means perfect renditions of Poliphilus’ words nor are they technologically perfect compared to what can be done with a professional computer animator or modeller. Instead, it is at least a first attempt to visualize those gardens, palaces, and architectural masterpieces, which have inspired theorists and practitioners over the centuries, encrypted in an almost unreadable mechanism of allegories.
Regardless to say, this project is ongoing. Monuments that I have attempted to piece together are still missing vital components within their computer graphic renditions. There are still many aspects described by Poliphilus that have not been included in these reconstructions partly for technological limitations and partly because they are still subject to study and design.

 

Visionary vs. Antique:

Among my challenges in visual interpretation was to distinguish “antique” from “visionary” according to Poliphilus. While describing “classical” ruins, it was not difficult identifying images similar to those in Piranesi’s etchings two hundred years later while illustrating Roman antiquity. In this case, research was involved in trying to design based on what the early humanists must have observed while surrounded by antiquity in the only place where legend and a strong classical past intertwine: Rome. Examples of temples, grand arches, baths, and much more, consumed by time and the disgrace of pillage, were plentiful. At the same time, Rome was a site of study and interest on the part of the early renaissance humanists including Pomponio Leto and others whose platonic ideals and love of the antique helped form a true antiquarian society. Poliphilus himself shared his interest and admiration for the technological beauty of the architecture built by the ancients as a sign of great wisdom long forgotten while despising his contemporary architects for their ignorance.
Web Page 5 - Image 10On the other hand, Poliphilus also mentions certain buildings that imply a new architecture that reveals itself only in the century following the publication of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. The best example is his description of the Palace of Queen Eleutirillide. With extravagant, almost baroque use of decoration, he describes its interiors with few clues and gives only a hint as to its exterior composition. He mentions a symmetrical plan with an orderly distribution of rooms, courtyard spaces, highly decorated walls with frescoes, articulate wood coffer ceilings decorated in gold, two hundred columns, marble sculpture and ornamentation. With seeming awe, Poliphilus presents the reader with this list as if it was impossible to describe in totality the palace’s massive composition as he had done successfully with the temple to Venus Physizoa. In fact, the author dedicates more time to describing the labyrinthine parks and gardens adjacent to the Queen’s palace.
Based on Poliphilus’ indications, the plan for the palace was not difficult for me to reconstruct. However, the challenge came to “designing” its exterior architecture or façades. Most design choices start with a strong concept. The Hypnerotomachia Poliphili was published on a date that was a turning point in European civilization. A new hemisphere had been discovered and political changes were rebalancing the power struggle in Europe, giving birth to new, modern states. Architecture was a consequence to these events and the Hypnerotomachia as a genre was a perfect mixture between late medieval literary traditions and a new innovative consciousness typical of the late Quattrocento. It was a perfect symbol of the changing times and transformations from a late medieval society to a modern area. For this reason, I chose to examine samples of the second Renaissance, that is, the Cinquecento, as an inspiration in developing motifs for the reconstruction of Queen Eleutirillide’s palace due to the fact that Poliphilus hints to forms that are not typical of his period. It seemed appropriate to choose a more mature form of architectural history since the Cinquecento was an implementation and further development of what was previously initiated by the efforts of theorists such as Alberti, Filarete, and especially Francesco di Giorgio in the century before. In fact, the works of Sebastiano Serlio and the architecture of the period were very helpful in initiating concepts for decorations, planning issues, and architectural conception.
There were also challenges in visual interpretation, especially discrepancy with the amount of detail of Poliphilus’ descriptions in his dream. In some cases, the author dedicates many pages with minute details and artistic description to one monument and its parts, leaving little space for interpretation as in the case of the Temple to Venus Physizoa. In other parts of the Hypnerotomachia, and in the case of the Polyandrion of Lost Loves, for example, Poliphilus alludes to only certain archetypes and materials, without describing in detail the rest. This leaves the reader perplexed as to how its architecture was composed (or de-composed.) In these cases, it was as if I had to assume the role of archaeologist in piecing together a “history” of monuments with only those clues left behind while excavating into the depths of the Hypnerotomachia. Poliphilus left room for interpretation, so I had to study and “design” the rest.
This leads to possible complications between erudite imagination and complete fantasy even to Poliphilus. Thanks to the aid of generations of scholarly research and bibliography as a guide, I hoped to have created images that are close to an honest reconstruction as can be accomplished. Once again, this is an ongoing project, which I hope will become of interest and further development. As the ancient inscription deciphered by Poliphilus suggests, if my patience is protection and life’s décor, then most certainly I will continue to believe in this project with as much patience as possible.

 

A Note on Ancient Measurements:

Almost all measurement terms utilized in the Hypnerotomachia refer to an order of standards used during ancient Roman times. The idea of a “standard,” as we know of today, was quite different in those times; they were more like approximate “guidelines.” Such standards where different depending in what part of the Empire you presented yourself in. If we choose, as an example, the quintessential Roman “foot” or pes romanus, you will notice that in Rome it was circa 29.7 cm. This was different than the pes romanus used in Pompei, which was about 27 cm (with a difference of 2.7 cm. circa). If this may seem insignificant, just imagine what the difference may have been when dividing large territorial spaces, such as farmland or property lots in different parts of the Empire!
Although the pes romanus was originally based on the Attic foot (not assuming however that the standards utilized in the Greek world could have coincided with those utilized throughout the Roman Empire), the actual “standard” was conserved in the temple of Iuno Moneta in Rome, similarly as we do today with our international Metric System in Paris.
Even after the fall of the Roman Empire, the same terms remained more or less in use, however the actual measurements changed from town to town in the Italian peninsula during the Middle Ages.
In order to have a better understanding of the “feel” or concept of space introduced in the Hypnerotomachia, the following multiples and sub-divisions of the Roman foot are presented here:

 

Web Page 5 - Image 8

CONTENTS:

 

Web Page 5 - Image 9

 

LIST OF PLATES:

CHAPTER ONE: METHODS & CHALLENGES IN VISUAL INTERPRETATION

 

I. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE PYRAMID OF FORTUNE 47
II. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE PYRAMID OF FORTUNE 48
III. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE PYRAMID OF FORTUNE 49
IV. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE PYRAMID OF FORTUNE 50
V. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE PYRAMID OF FORTUNE 51
VI. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR A MAJESTIC BRIDGE & FOUNTAIN DEDICATED TO “ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ” 52
VII. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR A MAJESTIC BRIDGE & FOUNTAIN DEDICATED TO “ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ” 53
VIII. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR A MAJESTIC BRIDGE & FOUNTAIN DEDICATED TO “ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ” 54
IX. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE BATHS “ΓΕΛΟΑΙΑΣΤΟΣ” 55
X. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE BATHS “ΓΕΛΟΑΙΑΣΤΟΣ” 56
XI. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE BATHS “ΓΕΛΟΑΙΑΣΤΟΣ” 57
XII. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE BATHS “ΓΕΛΟΑΙΑΣΤΟΣ” 58
XIII. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE TEMPLE TO VENUS PHYSIZOA 59
XIV. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE TEMPLE TO VENUS PHYSIZOA 60
XV. SCHEMATIC PLAN FOR THE PALACE AND GARDENS OF QUEEN ELEUTIRILLIDE 61
XVI. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE PALACE AND GARDENS OF QUEEN ELEUTIRILLIDE (THE FOUNTAIN) 62
XVII. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE PALACE AND GARDENS OF QUEEN ELEUTIRILLIDE (COURTYARD ENTRANCE) 63
XVIII. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE PALACE AND GARDENS OF QUEEN ELEUTIRILLIDE 64
XIX. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE POLYANDRION & HYPOGEUM 65
XX. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR THE POLYANDRION & HYPOGEUM 66
XXI. SKETCHES & SCHEMATICS FOR AN ANCIENT PORT 67
XXII. SEPIA STUDY OF THE PYRAMID “OCCASIO” AND RUINS 68
XXIII. SEPIA STUDY OF THE PYRAMID “OCCASIO” AND RUINS 69
XXIV. SEPIA STUDY OF THE OCTOGONAL BUILDING & FOUNTAIN DEDICATED TO “ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ” 70
XXV. “AURORAE DESCRIPTIO” DESCRIBED BY POLIPHILUS IN THE BEGINNING OF HIS HYPNEROTOMACHIA 71
XXVI. SEPIA STUDY OF THE POLYANDRION 72

CHAPTER TWO: THE GREAT PYRAMID

 

I. GENERAL PLAN & SECTION DRAWINGS OF THE MAIN PYRAMID COMPLEX 87
II. GENERAL FAÇADE OF THE MAIN PYRAMID COMPLEX 88
III. SECTION & ELEVATION OF THE SUMMIT: LIGHT CHANNELS, WINDING STAIRWAY, OBELISK, & WIND MACHINE 89
IV. DRAWING DETAILS: MAIN PORTAL, INSCRIPTIONS, WIND MACHINE, ARCHITECTURAL ORDERS, TYPICAL LIGHT PORTAL & SECTION OF PYRAMID SUMMIT 90
V. MAIN PERSPECTIVE VIEW 91
VI. PERSPECTIVE VIEWS OF ENTRANCE 92
VII. DETAILS 93
VIII. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEWS: BASE & SUMMIT 94

 

CHAPTER THREE: THE GREAT HIPPODROMUS & ITS MONUMENTS

 

I. PARTIAL BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF THE HIPPODROMUS “PIAZZA” AS SEEN FROM THE SUMMIT OF THE PYRAMID & MAIN PERSPECTIVE VIEW SEEN TOWARDS THE PYRAMID 111
II. THE GREAT HIPPODROMUS: PERSPECTIVE VIEW SEEN FROM THE “PIAZZA” ENTRANCE TOWARDS THE PYRAMID 112
III. THE GREAT HIPPODROMUS: WIDE PERSPECTIVE VIEW TOWARDS XYSUS, MALE COLOSSUS, & CANALS 113
IV. THE GREAT HIPPODROMUS: PERSPECTIVE VIEWS OF CANALS 114
V. THE UNHAPPY HORSE: FAÇADE VIEWS OF THE BASE 115
VI. THE UNHAPPY HORSE: FAÇADE VIEWS OF THE BASE & CLOSE PERSPECTIVE VIEW 116
VII. THE ELEPHANT & OBELISK: PERSPECTIVE
VIEW 117
VIII. THE ELEPHANT & OBELISK: ELEVATION & FRONT PERSPECTIVE 118
IX. THE ELEPHANT & OBELISK: DETAIL 119
X. THE ELEPHANT & OBELISK: PERSPECTIVE VIEW TOWARDS PYRAMID & COLOSSUS 120
XI. HIPPODROMUS & ITS MONUMENTS: WIDE SECTION & PERSPECTIVE 121-122

 

CHAPTER FOUR: THE GRAND ARCH

 

I. MAIN PERSPECTIVE VIEW 139
II. TOP PERSPECTIVE VIEW 140
III. PROPORTIONS 141
IV. PERSPECTIVE & DETAIL VIEWS 142

 

CHAPTER FIVE: A MAJESTIC BRIDGE & FOUNTAIN DEDICATED TO ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ

 

I. A MAJESTIC BRIDGE: MAIN PERSPECTIVE VIEW 153
II. A MAJESTIC BRIDGE: DETAILS WITH THE STANDARD “PATIENTIA EST ORNAMENTUM CUSTODIA ET PROTECTIO VITAE” 154
III. A MAJESTIC BRIDGE: PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING BACK TOWARDS THE PYRAMID “OBSCURITY” 155
IV. A MAJESTIC BRIDGE: PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING FORWARD TOWARDS THE REALM OF ELEUTIRILLIDE “LIBERTY” 156
V. THE FOUNTAIN ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ: MAIN PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE OCTOGONAL BUILDING 157
VI. THE FOUNTAIN ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ: ELEVATION FAÇADE 158
VII. THE FOUNTAIN ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ: ELEVATIONS AND A BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF THE OCTOGONAL BUILDING 159
VIII. THE FOUNTAIN ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ: DETAIL VIEWS OF THE VASE 160
IX. THE FOUNTAIN ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ: HOT AND COLD WATER SPROUTS FROM THE FOUNTAIN 161
X. THE FOUNTAIN ΠΑΝΤΩΝ ΤΟΚΑΔΙ: PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE OCTOGONAL BUILDING 162

 

CHAPTER SIX: “ΓΕΛΟΙΑΣΤΟΣ” : THE BATHS OF THE FIVE NYMPHS

 

I. FRONT PERSPECTIVE VIEW 173
II. PLAN 174
III. FRONT & BACK EXTERIOR ELEVATIONS 175
IV. SIDE EXTERIOR ELEVATION 176
V. LATITUDINAL SECTION 177
VI. LONGITUDINAL SECTION 178
VII. PERSPECTIVE SECTION 179
VIII. ROOF PLAN 180
IX. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE TOWARDS ENTRANCE 181
X. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE TOWARDS THE “ΓΕΛΟΙΑΣΤΟΣ” FOUNTAIN 182
XI. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE: DETAIL 183
XII. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE: DETAIL 184
XIII. WIDE INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE: TOWARDS FOUNTAIN 185
XIV. WIDE INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE: TOWARDS ENRANCE 186
XV. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE: DETAIL 187
XVI. EXTERIOR GROUNDS OF THE BATHS 188
XVII. FROM OBSCURITY OF THE PYRAMID TO THE REALM OF ELEUTIRILLIDE: A SECTION OF MONUMENTS 189-190

 

CHAPTER SEVEN: THE PALACE & GARDENS OF QUEEN ELEUTIRILLIDE

 

I. FAÇADE & PLAN DRAWINGS OF THE MAIN VILLA COMPLEX 215
II. PLAN RECONSTRUCTION OF THE VILLA & SURROUNDING GARDENS 216
III. MAIN PERSPECTIVE VIEW & DETAIL OF THE PODIUM 217
IV. PRONAO ENTRANCE & PODIUM 218
V. PERSPECTIVE VIEW FROM MAIN COURTYARD ENTRANCE 219
VI. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE PROPYLAEUM 220
VII. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF MAIN FAÇADE & COURTYARD 221
VIII. MATERIALS: MARBLE POLYCROME & MOSAIC FLOOR AT MAIN COURTYARD 222
IX. MATERIALS: COLUMNS 223
X. MATERIALS: COLUMNS 224
XI. ELEVATION OF THE PROPYLAEUM 225
XII. MAIN PERSPECTIVE VIEW (ENLARGED) 226
XIII. MAIN ELEVATION & PLAN OF THE MONUMENT TO THE DIVINE TRINITY 227
XIV. ELEVATIONS OF THE MONUMENT TO THE DIVINE TRINITY 228
XV. AXONOMETRIC VIEW OF THE MONUMENT TO THE DIVINE TRINITY 229
XVI. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE MONUMENT TO THE DIVINE TRINITY 230
XVII. PERSPECTIVE DETAIL OF THE MONUMENT TO THE DIVINE TRINITY 231
XVIII. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE BASE & THE
PRISM 232
XIX. PERSPECTIVE VIEWS OF THE MONUMENT TO THE DIVINE TRINITY 233
XX. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE QUEEN’S THRONE COURTYARD 234
XXI. ANGLE VIEW OF THE QUEEN’S THRONE COURTYARD 235
XXII. WIDE PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE QUEEN’S THRONE COURTYARD 236
XXIII. BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF THE AQUATIC LABYRINTH 237
XXIV. VIEW OF THE MAIN TOWER & ENTRANCE GATE 238
XXV. VIEW OF THE AQUATIC LABYRINTH TOWARDS THE MAIN TEMPLE COMPLEX 239
XXVI. THE AQUATIC LABYRINTH: INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE S 240
XXVII. THE AQUATIC LABYRINTH: EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE S 241
XXVIII. THE AQUATIC LABYRINTH: FAÇADE OF THE MAIN TOWER 242

 

CHAPTER EIGHT: THE TEMPLE TO VENUS PHYSIZOA

 

I. PERSPECTIVE SECTION VIEW OF THE
TEMPLE 263
II. FAÇADE, SECTION, & PLAN VIEW 264
III. EXTERIOR ARCHITECTURAL VIEWS WITH SURROUNDING GARDENS 265
IV. EXTERIOR ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS 266
V. INTERIOR ARCHITECTURAL VIEW 267
VI. INTERIOR ARCHITECTURAL VIEW 268
VII. INTERIOR ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS 269
VIII. TOP VIEW OF THE TEMPLE AND CHAPEL 270
IX. FRONT ELEVATION, VIEW OF ENTRANCE 271
X. BACK ELEVATION, VIEW OF PRONAO & CHAPEL 272
XI. SIDE ELEVATION 273
XII. LONGITUDINAL SECTION 274
XIII. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEWS 275
XIV. PERSPECTIVE SECTION VIEW OF THE CHAPEL 276
XV. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE CHAPEL ALTAR 277
XVI. DETAILED VIEW OF THE ALTAR 278

 

CHAPTER NINE: AN ANCIENT PORT

 

I. PERSPECTIVE SECTION VIEW OF THE ANCIENT PORT 287-288
II. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF MAIN PORT HALL 289
III. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF MAIN PORT HALL 290
IV. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF MAIN PORT HALL & AMBULATORY 291
V. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF MAIN PORT HALL, AMBULATORY & LIGHT TOWER 292
VI. WIDE EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE SECTION 293
VII. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEW TOWARDS PORT 294
VIII. SECTION OF THE ANCIENT PORT 295-296

 

CHAPTER TEN: POLYANDRION: THE CEMETERY OF LOST LOVES

 

I. P LAN & ELEVATION OF THE POLYANDRION 317
II. ELEVATION STUDIES OF THE TRIBUNA & THE HYPOGEUM 318
III. POLYANDRION: SECTIONS 319
IV. PERSPECTIVE & BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF THE MAIN TEMPLE COMPLEX 320
V. PERSPECTIVE VIEWS OF THE CIRCULAR TEMPIETTO & PROPYLAEUM 321
VI. PERPECTIVE SIDE VIEWS OF THE PROPYLAEUM & TRIBUNA 322
VII. DETAILS: OBELISK, TEMPIETTO, & CIBORIUM 323
VIII. SECTION: THE MAIN TEMPLE COMPLEX WITHOUT THE HYPOGEUM 324
IX. MATERIALS: COLUMNS 325
X. MATERIALS: COLUMNS 326
XI. MATERIALS: CIBORIUM 327
XII. MATERIALS: OBELISK / RED THEBAN GRANITE 328
XIII. DETAIL: ELEVATION OF PROPYLAEUM 329
XIV. SECTIONS OF HYPOGEUM: ROUND SACRIFICIAL CHAMBER & RECTANGULAR CAVITY 330
XV. PERSPECTIVE SECTION OF THE HYPOGEUM 331
XVI. HYPOGEUM: PERSPECTIVE OF THE RECTANGULAR CAVITY, TOWARDS ALTAR 332
XVII. HYPOGEUM: PERSPECTIVE OF THE RECTANGULAR CAVITY, TOWARDS ENTRANCE 333
XVIII. HYPOGEUM: INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE OF THE RECTANGULAR CAVITY 334
XIX. HYPOGEUM: DETAIL, RECTANGULAR CAVITY 335
XX. HYPOGEUM: DETAIL, RECTANGULAR CAVITY 336
XXI. HYPOGEUM: PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF SACRIFICIAL CHAMBER 337
XXII. HYPOGEUM: PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF SACRIFICIAL CHAMBER, TOWARDS ALTAR 338
XXIII. HYPOGEUM: SACRIFICIAL ALTAR 339
XXIV. HYPOGEUM: PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF SACRIFICIAL CHAMBER, TOWARDS ENTRANCE 340
XXV. HYPOGEUM: DETAIL, SACRIFICIAL ALTAR & INSCRIPTION 341
XXVI. HYPOGEUM: INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE OF SACRIFICIAL CHAMBER 342
XXVII. POLYANDRION: SECTION OF ENTIRE COMPLEX & HYPOGEUM 343-344

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS:

1. POLIPHILUS & POLIA ARRIVE AT AN ANCIENT PORT 33
2. POLIPHILUS AMONGST ANCIENT RUINS (FRENCH EDITION) 38
3. PATIENTIA EST ORNAMENTUM CUSTODIA ET PROTECTIO VITAE 42
4. A GREAT PYRAMID 73
5. A GREAT PYRAMID (FRENCH EDITION) 76
6. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PYRAMID’S SUMMIT WITH THE OBELISK & ITS BASE 79
7. AN ELEPHANT & OBELISK 95
8. THE UNHAPPY HORSE (EQUUS INFŒLICITATIS) 98
9. THE UNHAPPY HORSE: INSCRIPTIONS ON THE BACK & FRONT SIDES OF THE BASE 99
10. THE UNHAPPY HORSE (EQUUS INFŒLICITATIS, FRENCH EDITION) 100
11. THE UNHAPPY HORSE: TWO-FACED FIGURES DANCING IN A CIRCLE 101
12. THE UNHAPPY HORSE: YOUNG PEOPLE GATHERING FLOWERS 102
13. AN ELEPHANT & OBELISK (FRENCH EDITION) 103
14. THE ELEPHANT’S HEADRESS 104
15. HIEROGLYPHICS INSCRIBED ON THE ELEPHANT’S BASE 106
16. THE GREAT ARCH 123
17. PROPORTIONS OF THE ARCH (FRENCH EDITION) 127
18. THE GREAT ARCH (FRENCH EDITION) 131
19. POLIPHILUS FLEES A DRAGON AT THE ARCH’S ENTRANCE 143
20. PATIENTIA EST ORNAMENTUM CUSTODIA ET PROTECTIO VITAE & FESTINA LENTE 145
21. THE FOUNTAIN DEDICATED TO THE MOTHER OF ALL THINGS 147
22. PROPORTIONS OF THE FOUNTAIN 148
23. INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE BATH (RECONTRUCTION) 163
24. CONCEPTUAL SKETCH RELATING TO POLIPHILUS ‘ PASSAGE: FROM OBSCURITY TO THE BATH. 165
25. THE PINNACLE OF THE BATH 166
26. THE BATH : EXTERIOR & INTERIOR VIEWS (FRENCH EDITION) 167
27. THE “CLEVER” FOUNTAIN OF THE BATH 169
28. ELEUTIRILLIDE’S FOUNTAIN 191
29. ELEUTIRILLIDE’S THRONE ROOM 197
30. ELEUTIRILLIDE’S THRONE ROOM: POLIPHILUS NEELS BEFORE THE QUEEN 200
31. ELEUTIRILLIDE’S GLASS GARDEN OR VIRIDARIUM (FRENCH EDITION) 203
32. THE WATER LABYRINTH (FRENCH EDITION) 204
33. THE GARDEN OF SILK WITH A RUSTIC HUT (FRENCH EDITION) 207
34. THE DISPLUVIUM & THE MONUMENT TO THE DIVINE TRINITY (FRENCH EDITION) 208
35. A MONUMENT TO THE DIVINE TRINITY 210
36. THE TEMPLE TO VENUS PHYSIZOA 243
37. BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF THE TEMPLE & PROPORTIONS 247
38. THE TEMPLE OF PHYSIZOA: EXTERIOR (FRENCH EDITION) 249
39. THE TEMPLE OF PHYSIZOA: INTERIOR VIEW (FRENCH EDITION) 250
40. THE TEMPLE’S LANTERN 252
41. THE BELLS OF THE TEMPLE 254
42. DOORS FOR THE TEMPLE’S ENTRANCE 256
43. THE CHAPEL ALTER 258
44. THE HIGH PRIESTESS BEGINS THE CEREMONY AT THE SACRED CHAPEL 259
45. POLIPHILUS & POLIA AT AN ANCIENT PORT (FRENCH EDITION) 279
46. STUDY DRAWING FOR AN ANCIENT PORT 281
47. STUDY SKETCHES : PORT ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS 282
48. STUDY SKETCHES: POLIPHILUS’ ITINERARY FROM THE PORT, RUINS OF A LARGE STRUCTURE, SACRED FOREST, AND POLYANDRION 283
49. STUDY SKETCHES: SECTION OF AN ANCIENT PORT 284
50. POLIPHILUS AMONGST ANCIENT RUINS 297
51. OBELISK IN HONOUR OF JULIUS CAESAR 299
52. HIEROGLYPHICS: “…LAWFUL JUSTICE…PEACE AND CONCORD …” 300
53. HIEROGLYPHICS: IN HONOUR OF JULIUS CAESAR 301
54. HIEROGLYPHICS: STRONGEST BOND OF AN EMPIRE & CAESAR’S MANY VICTORIES 302
55. POLYANDRION: THE FRAGMENT OF THE ZOPHORUS 303
56. STUDY SKETCH OF THE HYPOGEUM BELOW THE CIBORIUM 304
57. CIBORIUM 305
58. STUDY COLLAGE OF THE HYPOGEUM BELOW THE CIBORIUM 306
59. EPITAPH TO THE LOVERS LEONZIA & LOLIO 308
60. TOMB OF THE QUEEN OF CARIA 311
61. ENDNOTE N°23 OF CHAPTER 7: THE QUEEN’S THRONE COURTYARD DESCRIBED BY POLIPHILUS 371

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s